Featured holiday Lusitania route on the Al Andalus from Seville to Porto Spain and Portugal

5 nights/6 days
This luxury rail holiday aboard the famous Al Andalus luxury train takes you from Seville via Lisbon to Porto, with three nights on the train and a night in Seville before the start and a night in Porto at the end.
Included in your Expressions holiday
  • Scheduled flights with British Airways from London to Seville and from Lisbon to London
  • 1 night’s bed and breakfast in a Dreamer room at the Hospes Las Casas del Rey de Baeza in Seville
  • 3 nights’ accommodation in a “Grand Class” cabin on the Al Andalus train
  • 1 night’s bed and breakfast in a Classic room at the Pestana Palacio do Freixo in Porto
  • All meals and excursions whilst on the Al Andalus train
  • Private transfers from the airport to your hotel in Seville and back from your hotel in Porto to the airport

Luxury rail holiday on the Al Andalus train from Seville to Porto with 3 nights on the train, and one night in Seville and one night in Porto.

Highlights

Seville • Merida • Lisbon • Porto • Ribera del Duero

About the Al Andalus train

The Train: The Al Andalus Luxury Train is made up of historical suite cars which were built between 1928 and 1930 in France for the British monarchy to travel between Calais and the French Riviera. Alongside the saloon coaches, they form an elegant and comfortable train with a Belle Epoque air. Original elements of these genuine coaches are combined with the latest technology to allow travellers to enjoy maximum comfort and safety. The train is equipped with Wifi internet and has a computer in the lounge car. Accommodation: “Gran Clase” cabins are formed of two twin beds (both at ground level) which turn into comfortable sofas during the day. They are equipped with a wardrobe, luggage rack, safe, minibar and individual climate control. They have large windows and an ensuite bathroom with shower and hairdryer provided. Guests looks for a special treat may upgrade to a “Deluxe Suite”. These cabins have a double bed which is a sofa during the day. They have the same facilities as the “Gran Clase” cabins and their bathrooms are equipped with a hydro-massage shower/steam sauna. What’s included with the “Gran Clase” cabin: A la carte and buffet breakfasts every day All dinners and lunches (including wine, water, soft drinks and coffee) Welcome drink and snack Farewell dinner – gala party Travelling toiletries bag Free mineral water in the minibar Activities onboard: music and live performances, parties in the bar car, show cooking and cocktails, dancing etc. Tickets to museums, attractions and shows Excursions and scheduled tours Luxury coach accompanying the train Taxes and services – there is no obligation to tip Daily newspapers and magazines Multilingual guide throughout the tour What’s included with the Deluxe Suite: As above, plus: All non-alcoholic drinks in the minibar Options for crew to unpack and pack your luggage Not included: Optional laundry service Bar service

Special offers for this holiday>

Holiday price guide Prices from £3,170 per person based on two people sharing a double or twin room and Gran Clase cabin on the train. Supplement for upgrade to Deluxe Suite: £90 per person

From about

Holiday Code SNFH02

This holiday takes place in conjunction with the departure dates of the Al Andalus on this route.

Luxury rail holiday on the Al Andalus train from Seville to Porto with 3 nights on the train, and one night in Seville and one night in Porto.

Special offers for this holiday>

Holiday price guide Prices from £3,170 per person based on two people sharing a double or twin room and Gran Clase cabin on the train. Supplement for upgrade to Deluxe Suite: £90 per person

From about

Holiday Code SNFH02

This holiday takes place in conjunction with the departure dates of the Al Andalus on this route.

Al Andalus Seville to Porto

Seville to Porto

26 July 2022

Porto to Seville

11 August 2022

Special offers for this holiday>

Holiday price guide Prices from £3,170 per person based on two people sharing a double or twin room and Gran Clase cabin on the train. Supplement for upgrade to Deluxe Suite: £90 per person

From about

Holiday Code SNFH02

This holiday takes place in conjunction with the departure dates of the Al Andalus on this route.

Luxury rail holiday on the Al Andalus train from Seville to Porto with 3 nights on the train, and one night in Seville and one night in Porto.

Hotels included in this tour

Special offers

Call to make your booking and save an extra £50 per adult Call us instead of emailing us when you are thinking of booking a holiday and save an extra £50 per adult (in addition to any special offers that might be available). We want to talk to you to discuss your requirements and a phone call is usually the best way for you to define what you want enabling us to respond more accurately. We want to talk to you and you save an extra £50 per adult.

Holiday price guide Prices from £3,170 per person based on two people sharing a double or twin room and Gran Clase cabin on the train. Supplement for upgrade to Deluxe Suite: £90 per person

From about

Holiday Code SNFH02

This holiday takes place in conjunction with the departure dates of the Al Andalus on this route.

Holiday prices

Holiday prices
Prices are per person based on two people sharing a double or twin room
Date Gran Clase cabin Suite Deluxe
25 Jul 2022-10 Aug 2022 £3,170 £3,350




Special offers for this holiday>

Holiday price guide Prices from £3,170 per person based on two people sharing a double or twin room and Gran Clase cabin on the train. Supplement for upgrade to Deluxe Suite: £90 per person

From about

Holiday Code SNFH02

This holiday takes place in conjunction with the departure dates of the Al Andalus on this route.

Luxury rail holiday on the Al Andalus train from Seville to Porto with 3 nights on the train, and one night in Seville and one night in Porto.

Highlights of Lisbon

The area close to the city of Lisbon is known for its variety of attractions. Moorish architecture left over from Arabic rule can be seen in the Castelo de Sao Jorge in the Alfama. Collections of Portuguese art are on display in the Museu Gulbenkian, the Museu de Arte Antiga, and the Berardo Collection. For a taste of Portugal's maritime history, visit the Monasteiro dos Jeronimos. Sintra, the favourite haunt of Lord Byron, is home to twin-peak-top castles and royal palaces. Beautiful, golden sandy beaches can be found in Cascais to the west of Lisbon, or on the Costa da Caparica to the south; particularly idyllic are the coves between Setubal and Sesimbra. Peniche is a picturesque seaside town renowned for being one of Europe's best surfing spots. You can explore all that the area around the city of Lisbon has to offer with our Tour of the City and Countryside of the Lisboa Region.

Highlights of the Algarve

Known for having some of Portugal's most scenic beaches, the Algarve is a popular destination for those looking for a beach or water sports holiday enjoying the Portuguese sunshine. Sagres and Tavira are recognised as the best places for this. In Albufeira, Armacao de Pera, and Lagos you will find an abundance of the light-catching rocky outcrops and peaceful coves that the Algarve is so well known for. Salema, Burgau, and Sagres were once busy little fishing villages, and now still stand as testament to this important aspect of Portuguese culture. The Reserva Natural da Ria Formosa lies just off the southern coastline, the islands of which can be accessed from many towns, including Faro, Olhao, Fuseta, Cabanas, and Tavira; most of which are also ideal starting points from which to try a little surfing. White-washed and serene Alcoutim is an example of the less-developed Portuguese towns, with a hint of Andalucia in its appearance, and Loule is the perfect place to wander around a bustling market. You may also wish to visit the Roman ruins at Milreu, the Moorish town of Silves, or the Spa town of Caldas de Monchique. For outdoor pursuits, head into the Serra de Monchique Mountain Range.

Highlights of Porto and the Douro Valley

At the mouth of the Rio Douro lies Porto, an atmospheric town with a dramatic aspect and almost Parisian lifestyle. Its streets are lined with historic buildings and wine lodges serving the best of Portuguese wines. The nearby wine towns of Penafiel, Peso da Regua, Pinhao, and Amarante are also recommended for wine-tasting, but have a much more rural location. Amarante, in particular, is believed to be the most attractive wine town in the area, with a central triple-arched bridge, tall stone red-roofed houses interspersed with verdant trees, and a gently flowing river. To witness a sample of Portuguese Baroque architecture, visit the pilgrimage town of Lamego. The main attraction of this town, the Sanctuary of Our Lady of Remedios, lies at the top of an elaborate and intricately decorated set of zig-zagged stairways that pass through archways and across viewing balconies. In Porto, some of the greatest artistic triumphs of 17th century Portugal reside, the Se Cathedral in particular, in which every inch of the columns, archways, and altar have been adorned in golden floral and religious motifs, in true Baroque style. For something even more historic, visit the Palaeolithic rock formations of Vila Nova de Foz Coa, the largest outdoor gallery of stone age remains in the world, which have since been neighboured by flourishing vineyards. Along the rocky gorges of the river, you will find a number of castle-towns, including the Medieval walled town of Trancoso and the fortress town of Almeida.

Highlights of Madeira

A green and fertile island in the Atlantic Ocean, Madeira is situated off the coast of Morocco. Its coastline combines beautiful sandy beaches with rocky cliffs, the latter of which can be best appreciated at Cabo Girao. The island's capital, Funchal, is packed full with historic buildings, including 15th century churches and convents and a Se Cathedral as ornate as the one in Porto. Enjoy the relentless joviality of the street markets, or visit more peaceful attractions, such as the basalt cave of Capela de Sao Vicente or the island's protected nature reserves. Rare Laurissilva forests can be walked, trekked, or hiked through, affording guests sensational views; and the crystal clear waters off the coast can be swam through, perhaps below the water's surface so the ecosystems that live in the reefs can be appreciated. One of the greatest pleasures of Madeira, however, is wandering over the beaches, surveying the rock pools, and taking in the sights from the clifftops. Aside from the key regions that our Portuguese programme focuses on, there is much to find and see in Portugal. Those willing to drive a little further during the day will enjoy a much more diverse touring holiday.

Facts in brief

Capital Lisbon
Airport There are international airports at Lisbon, Porto and Faro, served by a variety of airlines from the UK, including British Airways, EasyJet, bmibaby, TAP, Jet2.
Size 35,000 sq. miles
Population 10 million

Luxury rail holiday on the Al Andalus train from Seville to Porto with 3 nights on the train, and one night in Seville and one night in Porto.

Highlights of Andalusia

With 800km of coastline, there are plenty of beaches to choose from - facing the Atlantic are the long, sandy beaches of the Costa de la Luz, extending south from the Portuguese border to Tarifa; covering the area between Malaga and Gibraltar is the famous Costa del Sol, known for its numerous beach resorts which range from the cheap and cheerful to exclusive luxury; to the south of Granada is the Costa Tropical, a stretch of coast with sandy coves and a pleasant microclimate; and to the east is the more rugged Costa de Almeria. A number of luxury resorts and hotels are located along each of these coastlines. Surrounding Granada is the Sierra Nevada, a mountain range where the Spanish mainland's highest peak can be found and home to white-washed mountain villages. In the far east of Andalusia is the Sierras de Cazorla, Segura y Las Villas Natural Park, the largest protected area in Spain where you can find hiking trails, mountain villages and many wild animals. Further south is The Cabo de Gata Natural Park, a land and sea reserve near Almeria which is home to unspoilt scenery and an abundance of wildlife. In the west of the region is the Doñana National Park, an extensive area in the delta of the Guadalquivir River which includes marshland and sand dunes and is a breeding ground of the endangered Iberian Lynx. Thanks to the region's great variety in landscapes, culture and cuisine, a luxury holiday to Andalusia is sure to be a delightful experience.

Cultural highlights of Andalusia

Many of the Andalusia's cultural highlights can be found in the three Moorish cities of Cordoba, Granada and Seville, all of which are home to a number of excellent luxury hotels. Cordoba, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and former centre of Muslim control during Andalusia's colonisation by the Islamic Empire. At the city's heart is the astounding Mezquita de Cordoba, a mediaeval mosque turned Catholic cathedral with endless Moorish arches, columns and glinting tiles of vibrant hues. Other highlights include the fascinating Jewish quarter and Roman ruins galore. Nearer the coast is Granada, where Islamic rule endured the longest and the magical Alhambra remains as a monument to this legacy. A 9th century palace fortress, it guards over the city from an elevated crag amongst vast, aromatic gardens. To the west, on the peaceful plains of River Guadalquivir, Seville quietly awaits discovery along with its three World Heritage Sites: the Alcazar palace, the gothic Cathedral and the General Archive of the Indies. Other towns and cities of interest in Andalusia include Jerez de la Frontera, where you can visit the sherry bodegas which make the city famous and watch the dressage displays which are held at The Royal Andalusian School of Equestrian Art; Cadiz, the oldest city in Europe which is surrounded almost entirely by water; Ronda, a spectacular city which is split in half by a narrow gorge; Malaga, birthplace of Picasso and home to a Museum which displays a collection of his work; the small town of Baeza, where you can find stunning examples of Renaissance architecture; and Almeria, a coastal city which is dominated by the Alcazaba, the largest Moorish fortress in Spain. During your stay in Andalusia make sure to witness the seductive art of flamenco. Alluring, passionate and cathartic, it's easy to understand how this gypsy tradition has become one of the most familiar emblems of Spanish culture.

Festivals in Andalusia

There are a huge number of local festivals held in villages, towns and cities throughout Andalusia, many of which have a religious significance. 5 January: Three Kings parades, February: Shrove Tuesday Carnivals, February: Seville Tapas Fair, February to March: Jerez Flamenco Festival, March/April: Holy week celebrations, April to October: Seville Bullfighting season, April/May: Seville Spring Fair, April/May: Úbeda Classical Music Festival, Mid May: Jerez Horse Fair, June to July: Granada Music & Dance Festival, June - July: Cordoba Guitar Festival, August: Malaga Summer Fair, September: Ronda bullfighting festival, November: Granada Jazz Festival.

Gastronomy in Andalusia

Cuisine in Andalusia is diverse, varying throughout the region and combining Arabic flavours with more common Mediterranean ingredients such as seafood, olive oil and an abundance of fresh fruit and vegetables. As the birthplace of tapas, Andalusia is an excellent place to try the snacks which are often served free with drinks in Granada. Other Andalusian specialities include Serrano ham from the Sierra Nevada and sherry from Jerez de la Frontera, as well as dishes such as ‘Ajo blanco’ (a white gazpacho), ‘Espetos de sardina’ (roasted sardines), ‘Huevos a la flamenca’ (baked eggs with vegetables) and ‘Fritura de pescado’ (mixed fried fish).

Luxury rail holiday on the Al Andalus train from Seville to Porto with 3 nights on the train, and one night in Seville and one night in Porto.

Highlights of the Heart of Spain

The three world-class art galleries which make up Madrid's Golden Triangle of Art, home to works by Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí and Francisco de Goya. The historical sights of Old Madrid, including the lavish Royal Palace, the grand Plaza Mayor and the city's spiritual centre, Puerta del Sol. Parque del Retiro, a popular spot for relaxation in the centre of Madrid with a boating lake. El Escorial, a large royal residence just outside Madrid which also functions as a monastery and is where many Spanish monarchs are buried. The Gothic cathedrals of León, Burgos and Toledo which feature stunning stained glass, mediaeval art and elaborate sculptures. The numerous castles which are scattered across the region including the Gothic-style Belmonte Castle, the Mudejár Coca Castle and the Moorish Alcazaba of Badajoz. The university city of Alcalá de Henares, birthplace of Cervantes, the 16th century author who wrote about the adventures of Don Quixote. The walled city of Ávila. The university city of Salamanca. Segovia, with its Roman Aqueduct and distinctive castle. Cuenca, a picturesque old town with houses which appear to hang over a gorge. The iconic windmills which sit on the plains near Consuegra. Roman ruins in Mérida. Elaborate palaces and manor houses in Trujillo and Cáceres. The wine-producing regions throughout central Spain including Ribera del Duero, La Mancha and Valdepeñas where visitors can visit vineyards and enjoy wine tastings. Mountain ranges which divide the central plateau, with many opportunities for walking and rock climbing.

Festivals in the Heart of Spain

February: Caja Madrid Flamenco Festival, February to March: Madrid Carnival, February to March: Madrid Contemporary Art Fair, March/April: Holy week celebrations, May: San Isidro bullfighting festival (Madrid), May/June: Toledo Corpus Christi processions (Toledo), July to August: Madrid summer arts festival, October: Saffron Rose Festival (Consuegra), October: Cervantes Week (Alcala de Henares), October to November: Madrid Autumn Festival

Gastronomy in the Heart of Spain

As expected, Madrid is home to some excellent restaurants serving a great range of cuisine from throughout Spain and around the world. Roasted meat and game as well as a variety of broths and stews are common features on menus throughout central Spain, where traditional cooking is simple and hearty. Cuisine varies slightly between the regions, with more paprika and saffron being used in the south. Various pulses are grown on the plains of Castilla y León, whilst Manchego cheese produced in La Mancha and high quality Ibérico ham is produced in Extremadura. There are a number of wine regions which produce high-quality red and white wines. Local dishes include ‘Pollo a lo Padre Pero’ (chicken with a spicy sauce), ‘El frite’ (fried lamb), ‘Sopa de ajo’ (garlic soup), ‘Pisto manchego’ (similar to ratatouille), ‘Yemas’ (a rich dessert made with egg yolks).

Climate in the Heart of Spain

The climate of central Spain is generally quite extreme, with extremely hot summers and bitterly cold yet dry winters. Rainfall is generally quite low thanks to the mountains which surround the region. Madrid can be almost unbearable in the summer months as temperatures reach 40 degrees, whilst during the temperatures regularly drop below freezing. Spring and autumn are the best times to visit as temperatures are warm and pleasant, although there is increased rainfall.

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